Experience India - My 1st Onam Celebrations – Jennifer Sandström

by Administrator30. December 2013 00:00

Jennifer hails from Gällivare currently living in India , she is an incurable dreamer in love with life. She just finished her internship at an IT company in Kochi, within Sales and Marketing , now setting off for new adventures. Jennie tells her experience about the wonderful Onam celebrations she had at her office in Kochi

 

 Onam was celebrated in grand way at my office Brigde Global IT Staffing. We were all dressed up according to the Indian traditional way, the women dressed in saris and men dressed in Mundus.

 

 

 

This is most of my colleagues here in India. The artwork on the ground in front of us, it's floral artwork can be seen everywhere these Onam times (and even in the grocery store that is so small and tight, they put out these flower leaves on the floor). It is to welcome the king who according to the saga comes to visit his land once a year.

So this is why Kerala is celebrating Onam and it is one of the biggest festivals here, comparable to Christmas I guess.On the main day of celebration everyone is free from work, and eat lots of food (Onasadya) with their loved ones.

 

This is Shintu and Aswathi, two colleagues that I work very close to. They are part of our marketing team.

 

 

The foreigners. This is the two Germans who just started their internship at the Bridge and whom I also live with, Judith to the left and Moritz to the right, next to me.

 

This is the dance they perform on Onam and it was very beautiful. Indians love to dance and sing, and I love it! Would you like to see a little video clip that I shot of the dance, you can do it here

 

Then, it was time for food. We hung out at the balcony on the roof of the office and they rolled out long mats for us to have the food at. Then they ran around and served 'Onasadya' or 'meals' as they are normally called, on the big banana leaves. It's a very classical type of dish here; lots of little dips, all vegetarian, with rice and pappadam (a crunchy 'fried' bread). You can eat as much food as you like and it’s very yummy.

 

 

The Indian women are so incredibly beautiful in their saris. I feel mostly like I’m a wannabe who is just imitating, I don’t feel like I’m supposed to wear this kind of dress. The saris in bright colors matched with golden jewelry looks stunning when the Indian women wear them with their black hair and dark skin tone – I watched them with envy.

  

Getting dressed sari is an art - not even all the women here know how to do it. I think most Indians find it very comfy to wear, and I might look so at first glance – but I found it very hot and when walking in the stairs it was really just in my way. But in summary I found it a nice experience and I’m glad to get the opportunity to take part in real Indian celebrations like Onam. 

 

Read my adventures in India here : jennifersandstrom.se

Tags: , , , , , ,

sweden

Through the roots of India - Malin Mendel Westberg

by Administrator12. December 2013 05:18

 

Malin was born in Göteborg where she completed her Journalist education and Studies in International relations. She travelled to many Asian countries like Burma, Nepal , Thailand and Sri Lanka for various Swedish channels like SVT, Swedish Radio and TV4. 

From 2005, she is working with SVT as a foreign correspondent in India, where she produce news and other programs as well as documentaries. She covered the violent gang rape incident happened in Delhi during Dec 2012. 

Currently she lives half a year in India so tripping between Stockholm and Goa with her husband  and 2 kids.  

Malin's roots to South Asia started from her childhood days when her father was working for Volvo at Lahore. In her new book Bombay Take Away she explores India through food. 

Why India ? 

When I first came to India in 2005 it was a feeling of home-coming since so many colors and flavors reminded me of Pakistan from my childhood. I could also notice a strong demand from Swedish media for coverage of India, so it was a good place for me to work from. After some time I also learnt that India has so many stories to tell that are exciting to the rest of the world and it is a great place to explore as a journalist. People are very nice and of course I also love the food. 

How do you balance your life in Stockholm and in India? 

Both places gives me valuable experiences since Sweden and India are very different, so the whole family learn a lot about the world as well as about ourselves being part of the two cultures. 

Does your childhood aquitance to Indian food and culture made you write 'Bombay Take away'? 

Yes, but also the fact that food is so important for the identity of people in India and so diverse, so almost everything in the society can be told through food I think. 

Is there any plans to have the book in English for Indian market? 

Yes my publisher is working on that, and I really hope it will reach the Indian public soon. 

Stockholm still don’t have an authentic Indian restaurant , did you mention that to Shanti Restaurant owners during the book launch there? 

No I think Shanti has very good food, and the owner has also started a Bengali restaurant to highlight his own roots, and he recently won the title of Best Bengali restaurant outside UK, in the British Curry awards. 

What do you cook at home when you are in India?

 I cook bhendi masala fry, fish curry, yellow dal fry, veg curry, kicheri, rogan josh, kebabs, chicken masala, channa masala, chapati, palao, fisk tikka and many more. 

 

Malin joins with Lakshmi and talks about Food , Report from India

Event :  Spice Root to India , Stockholm

Photo : India Unlimited

Event :  India Unlimited Launch, Stockholm

Photo : India Unlimited

 

 

Event :  Book launch at Shanti Restaurant , Stockholm

 

Buy Bombay Take Away

 

 

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

sweden

© 2013 Search Indie  
Trademarks belong to their respective owners.